Media Arts

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Media Arts enables students to analyse past technologies, and use existing and emerging technologies as they explore imagery, text and sound to create meaning. Students participate in, experiment with, and interpret cultures, media genres and styles, and different communication practices.

Students learn to be critically aware of ways that media are culturally used and negotiated, and are dynamic and central to the way they make sense of the world and themselves. They learn to interpret, analyse and develop media practices through their experiences in making media arts. They are inspired to imagine, collaborate and take on responsibilities in planning, designing and producing media artworks. (SCSA 2017)

Media Arts knowledge and skills ensure that, individually and collaboratively, students develop:

  • confidence to participate in, experiment with and interpret the media-rich culture and communications practices that surround them
  • aesthetic knowledge developed through exploration of imagery, text and sound to express ideas, concepts and stories using effective teamwork strategies to produce media artwork
  • creative and critical thinking skills to explore different perspectives in media as producers and consumers
  • awareness of their active participation in local and global media cultures, including using safe media practices when publishing online materials.

Years 7-10 Media Arts

Years 7 & 8 | All students in Years 7 & 8 undertake Visual Arts for one term as a taster and runs for two periods a week.

The Western Australian Curriculum, as mandated by the Schools Curriculum and Standards Authority is based on the requirement that all students will study at least two of the five Arts subjects from Pre-primary to Year 8. It is a requirement that students study a performance subject and a visual subject.

Year 7

In Year 7, students have opportunities to use and apply visual art language and artistic conventions in their design and production process. They create 2D and/or 3D artwork through projects which encourage personal response and an understanding of compositional structure. Students are made aware of the need for safe visual art practices, and present their artwork for display.

Students are introduced to an awareness of cultural, social and historical contexts that are embodied in artwork/art style which, in turn, allows them to link their own production to a given context. They consider how to present artwork to enhance audience interpretation. Students are introduced to a critical analysis framework to analyse artwork and use visual art terminology when responding. Teachers are required to address knowledge and skills in Visual Arts through one art form and art style below. Other art forms and art styles may be used in addition to teaching knowledge and skills in Visual Arts.

Art forms:
2D (drawing, painting, printmaking, textiles, illustration)
3D (ceramics, sculpture, installations)

Art styles: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art, contemporary Australian and international art.

Year 8

In Year 8, students have opportunities to use and apply visual art language and artistic conventions of more complexity in their design and production process. They create 2D and/or 3D artwork with the awareness of producing a personal response to given stimuli, through exposure to a variety of techniques. Students are made aware of the need for safe visual arts practices when using tools and media, as well as how to present their artwork for display.

Students become familiar with how and why artists, craftspeople or designers realise their ideas. They have opportunities to evaluate the contexts of culture, time and place within the artwork. Students apply knowledge of techniques used by other artists and consider audience interpretation in the production of their own artwork. Students are provided with critical analysis frameworks to analyse artwork and use visual art terminology when responding. Teachers are required to address knowledge and skills in Visual Arts through one art form and art style below. Other art forms and art styles may be used in addition to teaching knowledge and skills in Visual Arts.

Art forms:
2D (painting, printmaking, drawing, still photo, digital media, graphics, collage)
3D (ceramics, sculpture, installations)

Art styles: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art, Asian art, contemporary Australian/international artists, craftspeople and photographers.

Year 9 | Visual Arts is an elective in Year 9 and runs two periods a week for the whole year.

In Year 9, students use visual art language and artistic conventions of greater complexity during their design and production process. They document their ideas applying an understanding of compositional structure to create a unique personal response while representing either a theme/concept or subject matter. Students experience, adapt and manipulate materials, techniques, art styles/processes when producing 2D and/or 3D artwork which communicate artistic intention. Resolved artwork is displayed and appraised, with consideration to personal expression and audience. Students extend their knowledge and use of safe visual arts practice.

Students experience a growing awareness of how and why artists, craftspeople and/or designers are influenced by other artists, their environment and the contexts of culture, time and place. They continue to apply knowledge of techniques used by other artists in the production of their own work. Students are required to critically analyse traditional and contemporary artwork using various analysis frameworks, incorporating appropriate visual art language, art terminology and conventions. Teachers are required to address knowledge and skills in Visual Arts through one art form and art style below. Other art forms and art styles may be used in addition to teaching knowledge and skills in Visual Arts.

Art forms:
2D (painting, printmaking, drawing, photo and digital media, graphics, collage)
3D (ceramics, sculpture, installations, textiles and jewellery)

Art styles: Ancient art, Modernism (Impressionism, Expressionism, Cubism, Art Nouveau, Art Deco, Op Art, Pop Art), Australian art, contemporary craftspeople, designers and photographers, urban art.

Ceramics

Students can elect this subject to study 2 periods a week for the school year. This practical unit is designed to introduce students to ceramics from clay to fired products. Emphasis is placed on hand building processes and the use of simple technology such as the ceramic wheel with attention given to the details of ceramic art. Students will gain knowledge in a range of techniques and decorative processes.

Year 10

Visual Arts is an elective in Year 10 and run three periods a week for the whole year. In Year 10, students use visual art language and artistic conventions, in both written and practical work. They further develop and refine their ideas and techniques to resolve artwork by documenting the design, production and evaluation processes of their artwork. Students will extend their knowledge of art practices, such as, adaptation, manipulation, deconstruction and reinvention techniques, and use their understanding of a variety of art styles in the making of their 2D, 3D and/or 4D artwork. Students extend their knowledge and practise of safe and sustainable visual arts practice. Resolved artwork is exhibited and appraised, with consideration to their own artistic intentions, personal expression, and audience.

Students develop a greater understanding of how contexts of culture, time and place impact on the development of ideas and production of art forms in the artistic process. They continue to explore artistic influences while being encouraged to express greater individualism in their application of ideas and materials. Students are provided with opportunities to reflect on traditional and contemporary artwork using a breadth of critical analysis frameworks, incorporating visual art language, art terminology and conventions. Teachers are required to address knowledge and skills in Visual Arts through two art forms and one art style below. Other art forms and art styles may be used in addition to teaching knowledge and skills in Visual Arts.

Art forms:
2D (painting, printmaking, drawing, photo and digital media, graphics, textiles, collage)
3D (ceramics, sculpture, installations, textiles, jewellery)
4D (performance art, time-based video, digital animation)

Art styles: Realism, Modernism (Dadaism, Surrealism, Futurism), contemporary Australian art; Postmodernism, international art.

Senior School Media Arts

YEAR 11

ATAR Media Production and Analysis

The Media Production and Analysis ATAR course is designed to prepare students for a future in a digital and interconnected world by providing the skills, knowledge and understandings to tell their own stories and interpret the stories of others. Students are encouraged to explore, experiment and interpret their world, reflecting and analysing contemporary life, while understanding that this is done under social, cultural and institutional constraints.  Students, as users and creators of media products, consider the important role of audiences and their context. This course focuses on the application of media theory in the practical process.

Digital technologies have impacted upon and extended the capacity that the media play in Australian lives. Through new technologies, the role of the audience has shifted from a passive consumer to a more active participant, shaping the media through interaction and more accessible modes of production and dissemination of media work. Students’ interaction and opportunity to use technologies enables them to engage with current media and adapt to evolving media platforms.

The production of media work enables students to demonstrate their understanding of the key concepts of media languages, representation, audience, production, skills and processes as well as express their creativity and originality. When producing media work, students learn to make decisions about all aspects of production, including creative choices across pre-production, production and post-production phases. This provides an opportunity for students to reflect on and discuss their own creative work, intentions and outcomes. Within this process, skills are developed enabling students to manipulate technologies which simulate industry experiences.

Structure of the syllabus: The Year 11 syllabus is divided into two units, each of one-semester duration, typically delivered as a pair. The notional time for each unit is 55 class contact hours.

Unit 1 – Popular culture | Students analyse, view, listen to and interact with a range of popular media, develop their own ideas, learn production skills and apply their understandings and skills in creating their own productions.

Unit 2 – Journalism | In this unit, students will further their understanding of journalistic media. Students will analyse, view, listen to and interact with a range of journalistic genres and they undertake more extensive research into the representation and reporting of groups and issues within media work.

Each unit includes:

  • a unit description – a short description of the focus of the unit
  • suggested contexts – a context in which the unit content could be taught
  • unit content – the content to be taught and learned.

The course content is divided into five content areas:

  1. Media languages
  2. Representation
  3. Audience
  4. Production
  5. Skills and processes.

General Media Production and Analysis

The Media Production and Analysis General course aims to prepare students for a future in a digital and interconnected world by providing the skills, knowledge and understandings to tell their own stories and interpret the stories of others. Students are encouraged to explore, experiment and interpret their world, reflecting and analysing contemporary life, while understanding that this is done under social, cultural and institutional constraints. Students, as users and creators of media products, consider the important role of audiences and their context. This course focuses on the development of technical skills in the practical process.

Digital technologies have had an impact on an extended, the capacity that the media play in all Australian lives. Through new technologies, the role of the audience has shifted from a passive consumer to a more active participant, shaping the media through interaction and more accessible modes of production and dissemination of media work. Students’ interaction and opportunity to use technologies enables them to engage with current media and adapt to evolving media platforms.

The production of media work enables students to demonstrate their understanding of the key concepts of media languages, representation, audience, production, skills and processes as well as express their creativity and originality. When producing media work, students learn to make decisions about all aspects of production, including creative choices across pre-production, production and post-production phases. This provides an opportunity for students to reflect on and discuss their own creative work, intentions and outcomes. Within this process, skills are developed enabling students to manipulate technologies which simulate industry experiences.

Structure of the syllabus: The Year 11 syllabus is divided into two units, each of one-semester duration, typically delivered as a pair. The notional time for the pair of units is 110 class contact hours.

Unit 1 – Mass media | Within this broad focus, students reflect on their own use of the media, common representations, including the examination of characters, stars and stereotypes and the way media is constructed and produced.

Unit 2 – Point of view | In this unit, students will be introduced to the concept and learn how a point of view can be constructed. They will analyse media work and construct a point of view in their own productions.

Each unit includes:

  • a unit description – a short description of the focus of the unit
  • suggested contexts – a context in which the unit content could be taught
  • unit content – the content to be taught and learned.

The course content is divided into five content areas:

  1. Media languages
  2. Representation
  3. Audience
  4. Production
  5. Skills and processes.

YEAR 12

ATAR Media Production and Analysis

The Media Production and Analysis ATAR course aims to prepare all students for a future in a digital and interconnected world by providing the skills, knowledge and understandings to tell their own stories and interpret others’ stories. Students learn the languages of media communication and how a story is constructed using representations. Students are encouraged to explore, experiment and interpret their world, reflecting and analysing contemporary life while understanding that this is done under social, cultural and institutional constraints. Students as users and creators of media products, consider the important role of audiences and their context.

Digital technologies have impacted upon and extended the capacity that the media play in Australian lives. Through new technologies, the role of the audience has shifted from a passive consumer to a more active participant, shaping the media through interaction and more accessible modes of production and dissemination of media work. Students’ interaction and opportunity to use technologies enables them to engage with current media and adapt to evolving media platforms.

The production of media work enables students to demonstrate their understanding of the key concepts of media languages, representation, audience, production, skills and processes as well as express their creativity and originality. When producing media work, students learn to make decisions about all aspects of production, including creative choices across pre-production, production and post-production phases. This provides an opportunity for students to reflect on and discuss their own creative work, intentions and outcomes. Within this process, skills are developed enabling students to manipulate technologies which simulate industry experiences.

Structure of the syllabus: The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units which are delivered as a pair. The notional time for the pair of units is 110 class contact hours.

Unit 3 – Media art | In this unit students will analyse, view, listen to and interact with contemporary and traditional examples of media art, identifying techniques and themes, meanings that are created and audiences’ interpretations. They consider the representation of values and technological developments that influence perceptions of art within media work.

Unit 4 – Power and persuasion | The focus of this unit is power and persuasion. Through this broad focus, students extend their understanding of persuasive media, examining the way the media is able to reflect, challenge and shape values and attitudes. They critically analyse, view, listen to, and interact with a range of media work, considering the purposes and values of producers and audiences.

Each unit includes:

  • a unit description – a short description of the focus of the unit
  • unit content – the content to be taught and learned.

The course content is divided into five content areas:

  1. Media languages
  2. Representation
  3. Audience
  4. Production
  5. Skills and processes

General Media Production and Analysis

The Media Production and Analysis General course aims to prepare all students for a future in a digital and interconnected world by providing the skills, knowledge and understandings to tell their own stories and interpret others’ stories. Students learn the languages of media communication and how a story is constructed using representations. Students are encouraged to explore, experiment and interpret their world, reflecting and analysing contemporary life while understanding that this is done under social, cultural and institutional constraints. Students as users and creators of media products, consider the important role of audiences and their context.

Digital technologies have had an impact on and extended the capacity that the media play in all Australian lives. Through new technologies, the role of the audience has shifted from a passive consumer to a more active participant, shaping the media through interaction and more accessible modes of production and dissemination of media work. Students’ interaction and opportunity to use technologies enables them to engage with current media and adapt to evolving media platforms.

The production of media work enables students to demonstrate their understanding of the key concepts of media languages, representation, audience, production, skills and processes as well as express their creativity and originality. When producing media work, students learn to make decisions about all aspects of production, including creative choices across pre-production, production and post-production phases. This provides an opportunity for students to reflect on and discuss their own creative work, intentions and outcomes. Within this process, skills are developed enabling students to manipulate technologies which simulate industry experiences.

Structure of the syllabus: The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units which are delivered as a pair. The notional time for the pair of units is 110 class contact hours.

Unit 3 – Entertainment | Within this broad focus, students will expand their understanding of media languages, learning how codes and conventions are used to construct entertainment media.

Unit 4 – Representation and reality | Students will consider different types of representations and how they relate to the construction of reality within media work.

Each unit includes:

  • a unit description – a short description of the focus of the unit
  • suggested contexts – a context in which the unit content could be taught
  • unit content – the content to be taught and learned.

The course content is divided into five content areas:

  1. Media languages
  2. Representation
  3. Audience
  4. Production
  5. Skills and processes.