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YEAR 11

ATAR Dance

The Dance ATAR course acknowledges the interrelationship between practical and theoretical aspects of dance – the making and performing of movement and the appreciation of its meaning. Through critical decision-making in individual and group work, movement is manipulated and refined to reflect the choreographer’s intent. Students use a wide range of creative processes, such as improvisation and the use of choreographic elements and devices and draw on their own physicality and the interpretation of existing work of others to create unique dance works. They investigate how technologies are used to extend and enhance dance design. They also learn how dance styles and forms are historically derived and culturally valued. Through dance, students experience an intrinsic sense of enjoyment and have an opportunity to achieve a high level of movement skills.

The Dance ATAR course develops and presents ideas through a variety of genres, styles and forms, as it provides a unique way in which to express our cultural view and understanding of the world. Through critical
decision making in individual and group work, movement is manipulated and refined to reflect the choreographer’s intent. Students use a wide range of creative processes, such as improvisation and the use of choreographic elements and devices, and draw on their own physicality and the interpretation of existing work of others to make dance works.

The study of dance draws on other disciplines, including yoga, martial arts and gymnastics. It is essential that students demonstrate safe dance practices and understand health issues that will enhance their general physical
well-being and prolong their dance involvement.

Students reflect on, respond to, and evaluate how dance styles and forms are historically derived and culturally valued. They learn about the origins of dance and its importance as a form of expression and that it can represent a variety of political, cultural and historical motivations. This understanding informs their own dance-making and the dance works of others. They use appropriate terms and language to describe dance.

In performing dance, technical, design and expressive skills are incorporated and developed. The opportunity to present dance to an audience enables students to understand and undertake a wide range of production and design concepts, skills and roles. Dance may draw on other art forms such as music, art and electronic media to broaden students’ knowledge and interest in the Arts.

Through participation in the Dance ATAR course, students develop transferable skills essential to their future. These include communication skills, collaborative teamwork skills, negotiation and conflict resolution skills, problem-solving skills, as well as the ability to organise, analyse and evaluate. Participation may lead to opportunities for future study in dance or related arts fields.

Structure of the syllabus

The Year 11 syllabus is divided into two units, each of one semester duration, which are typically delivered as a pair. The notional time for each unit is 55 class contact hours.

Unit 1 – Popular Culture

This unit focuses on the exploration of dance in popular culture and how this leads to a wider understanding of the diverse contexts and functions of dance in society.

Unit 2 – Australian dance

This unit focuses on the diverse range of functions and contexts of dance in Australia. Students analyse critically their own cultural beliefs and values in relation to traditional and contemporary dance forms and styles, and develop an understanding of their own dance heritage.

Each unit includes:

  • a unit description – a short description of the focus of the unit
  • unit content – the content to be taught and learned.

Organisation of content

This course is divided in to three content areas:

  • Choreography
  • Performance
  • Contextual knowledge.

Prescribed genre

In this course, students must work in the contemporary genre. This requirement is preparation for Year 12 studies where Performance 2 in the ATAR course Practical (performance) examination for Dance is the set solo in the contemporary genre provided by the School Curriculum and Standards Authority.

Suggested genres

Examples of other genres that may be studied in addition to contemporary include, but are not limited to: ballet, jazz, hip-hop, tap, ballroom and/or cultural dance, for example, Spanish, Indian.

GENERAL DANCE

The Dance General course acknowledges the interrelationship between practical and theoretical aspects of dance – the making and performing of movement and the appreciation of its meaning. Through decision-making in individual and group work, students use a wide range of creative processes, such as improvisation and the use of choreographic elements and devices to create dance works. They also learn how dance styles and forms are historically derived and culturally valued. Through dance, students experience an intrinsic sense of enjoyment and have an opportunity to achieve a high level of movement skills.

The Dance General course develops and presents ideas through a variety of genres, styles and forms, as it provides a unique way in which to express our cultural view and understanding of the world. Through critical
decision-making in individual and group work, movement is manipulated and refined to reflect the choreographer’s intent. Students use a wide range of creative processes, such as improvisation and the use of choreographic elements and devices, and draw on their own physicality and the interpretation of existing work of others to make dance works.

The study of dance draws on other disciplines, including yoga, martial arts and gymnastics. It is essential that students demonstrate safe dance practices and understand health issues that will enhance their general physical
well-being and prolong their dance involvement.

Students reflect on, respond to, and evaluate how dance styles and forms are historically derived and culturally valued. They learn about the origins of dance and its importance as a form of expression and that it can represent a variety of political, cultural and historical motivations. This understanding informs their own dance-making and the dance works of others. They use appropriate terms and language to describe dance.

In performing dance, technical, design and expressive skills are incorporated and developed. The opportunity to present dance to an audience enables students to understand and undertake a wide range of production and design concepts, skills and roles. Dance may draw on other art forms, such as music, art and electronic media to broaden students’ knowledge and interest in the Arts.

Structure of the syllabus

The Year 11 syllabus is divided into two units, each of one semester duration, which are typically delivered as a pair. The notional time for each unit is 55 class contact hours.

Unit 1 – Exploring the components of dance

In this unit, students explore the elements of dance and processes of choreography, and solve structured choreographic tasks to produce dance works for performance.

Unit 2 – Dance as entertainment

In this unit, students explore the entertainment potential of dance and choreography.

Each unit includes:

  • a unit description – a short description of the focus of the unit
  • unit content – the content to be taught and learned.

Organisation of content

This course is divided in to three content areas:

  • Choreography
  • Performance
  • Contextual knowledge.

Suggested genres

Examples of genres that may be studied in this course include, but are not limited to: contemporary, ballet, jazz, hip-hop, tap, ballroom and cultural dance, for example, Spanish, Indian.

CUA20113 Certificate II in Dance (RTO 52499 – VETiS Consulting) – One Year Course

This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to complete a Certificate II in Dance. This course will cater for students who wish to pursue a practical and performance based course. Students will explore different dance styles such as: contemporary dance; jazz dance; Hip Hop and cultural dance.

 

YEAR 12

ATAR Dance

The Dance ATAR course develops and presents ideas through a variety of genres, styles and forms, as it provides a unique way in which to express our cultural view and understanding of the world. Through critical
decision-making in individual and group work, movement is manipulated and refined to reflect the choreographer’s intent. Students use a wide range of creative processes, such as improvisation and the use of choreographic elements and devices, and draw on their own physicality and the interpretation of existing work of others to make dance works.

Students reflect on, respond to, and evaluate how dance styles and forms are historically derived and culturally valued. They learn how the origins of dance and its importance as a form of expression and that it can represent a variety of political, cultural and historical motivations. This understanding informs their own dance-making and the dance works of others. They use appropriate terms and language to describe dance.

In performing dance, technical, design and expressive skills are incorporated and developed. The opportunity to present dance to an audience enables students to understand and undertake a wide range of production and design concepts, skills and roles. Dance may draw on other art forms such as music, art and electronic media to broaden students’ knowledge and interest in the Arts.

Through participation in the Dance ATAR course, students develop transferable skills essential to their future. These include communication skills, collaborative teamwork skills, negotiation and conflict resolution skills, problem-solving skills, as well as the ability to organise, analyse and evaluate. Participation may lead to opportunities for future study in dance or related arts fields.

Structure of the syllabus

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units which are delivered as a pair. The notional time for the pair of units is 110 class contact hours.

Unit 3 – Youth voice

This unit focuses on creating dance that explores original concepts and expresses personal ideas. The students will consider how dance reflects and is shaped by society and its values.

Unit 4 – Extending the boundaries

This unit focuses on the development of choreographic ideas to create unique dance work with personal style. The students analyse critically and evaluate the relationships between dance works, audiences and contexts.

Each unit includes:

  • a unit description – a short description of the focus of the unit
  • unit content – the content to be taught and learned.

Organisation of content

This course is divided in to three content areas:

  • Choreography
  • Performance
  • Contextual knowledge.

Prescribed genre

In this course, students must work in the contemporary genre. Performance 2 in the ATAR course Practical (performance) examination for Dance is the set solo in the contemporary genre provided by the School Curriculum and Standards Authority.

Suggested genres

Examples of other genres that may be studied in addition to contemporary include, but are not limited to: ballet, jazz, hip-hop, tap, ballroom and/or cultural dance, for example, Spanish, Indian. Performance 1 in the Dance Practical (performance) examination is an original solo composition in genre of choice.

General Dance

The Dance General course develops and presents ideas through a variety of genres, styles and forms, as it provides a unique way in which to express our cultural view and understanding of the world. Through critical decision making in individual and group work, movement is manipulated and refined to reflect the choreographer’s intent. Students use a wide range of creative processes, such as improvisation and the use of choreographic elements and devices, and draw on their own physicality and the interpretation of existing work of others to make dance works.

Students reflect on, respond to, and evaluate how dance styles and forms are historically derived and culturally valued. They learn about the origins of dance and its importance as a form of expression and that it can represent a variety of political, cultural and historical motivations. This understanding informs their own dance-making and the dance works of others. They use appropriate terms and language to describe dance.

In performing dance, technical, design and expressive skills are incorporated and developed. The opportunity to present dance to an audience enables students to understand and undertake a wide range of production and design concepts, skills and roles. Dance may draw on other art forms, such as music, art and electronic media to broaden students’ knowledge and interest in the Arts.

Through participation in the Dance General course, students develop transferable skills essential to their future. These include communication skills, collaborative teamwork skills, negotiation and conflict resolution skills, problem solving skills, as well as the ability to organise, analyse and evaluate. Participation may lead to opportunities for future study in dance or related arts fields.

Structure of the syllabus

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units which are delivered as a pair. The notional time for the pair of units is 110 class contact hours.

Unit 3 – Popular culture

This unit focuses on the exploration of dance in popular culture and how this leads to a wider understanding of the diverse contexts and functions of dance in society.

Unit 4 – Australian dance

This unit focuses on the diverse range of functions and contexts of dance in Australia. Students critically analyse their own cultural beliefs and values in relation to traditional and contemporary dance forms and styles, and develop an understanding of their own dance heritage.

Each unit includes:

  • a unit description – a short description of the focus of the unit
  • unit content – the content to be taught and learned.

Organisation of content

This course is divided in to three content areas:

  • Choreography
  • Performance
  • Contextual knowledge.

Suggested genres

Examples of genres that may be studied in this course include, but are not limited to: contemporary, ballet, jazz, hip-hop, tap, ballroom and cultural dance, for example, Spanish, Indian.

CUA20113 Certificate II in Dance (RTO 52499 – VETiS Consulting) – One Year Course

This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to complete a Certificate II in Dance. This course will cater for students who wish to pursue a practical and performance based course. Students will explore different dance styles such as: contemporary dance; jazz dance; Hip Hop and cultural dance.