Senior School Drama

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Year 11

ATAR

The Drama ATAR course focuses on aesthetic understanding and drama in practice as students integrate their knowledge and skills. They use the elements and conventions of drama to develop and present ideas and explore personal and cultural issues. They engage in drama processes such as improvisation, playbuilding, text interpretation, playwriting and dramaturgy which allow them to create original drama and interpret a range of texts written or devised by others. Their work in this course includes production and design aspects involving sets, costumes, makeup, props, promotional materials, and sound and lighting. Increasingly, students use technologies such as digital sound and multimedia. They present drama to a range of audiences and work in different performance settings.

Students work independently and collaboratively, learning time management skills, showing initiative and demonstrating leadership and interpersonal skills. The Drama ATAR course requires them to develop and practise problem-solving skills through creative and analytical thinking processes. They develop their capacity to respond to, reflect on, and make informed judgements using appropriate terminology and language to describe, analyse, interpret and evaluate drama, drawing on their understanding of relevant aspects of other art forms.

In this course, students engage in both Australian and world drama practice. They understand how drama has changed over time and will continue to change according to its cultural context. Through the Drama ATAR course, they can understand the experience of other times, places and cultures in an accessible, meaningful and enjoyable way. They understand the economic factors that affect drama practice and explore the vocational opportunities that drama offers.

Structure of the syllabus:

The Year 11 syllabus is divided into two units, each of one semester duration, which are typically delivered as a pair. The notional time for each unit is 55 class contact hours.

Unit 1 – Representational, realist drama

This unit focuses on representational, realistic drama forms and styles. Students explore techniques of characterisation through different approaches to text interpretation, particularly those based on the work of Stanislavski and other representational drama.

Unit 2 – Presentational, non-realist drama

This unit focuses on presentational, non-realist drama. Students explore techniques of role and/or character through different approaches to text interpretation, particularly those based on the work of Brecht and other presentational drama.

Each unit includes:

  • a unit description – a short description of the focus of the unit
  • unit content – the content to be taught and learned. This includes acting and non-acting roles and a suggested text list for each unit.

Organisation of content:

The course content is divided into three content areas:

  • drama language
  • contextual knowledge
  • production and performance

General

The Drama General course focuses on aesthetic understanding and drama in practice as students integrate their knowledge and skills. They use the elements and conventions of drama to develop and present ideas and explore personal and cultural issues. They engage in drama processes, such as improvisation, play building, text interpretation, playwriting and dramaturgy which allow them to create original drama and interpret a range of texts written or devised by others. Their work in this course includes production and design aspects involving sets, costumes, makeup, props, promotional materials, stage management, front-of-house activities, and sound and lighting. Increasingly, students use technologies, such as digital sound and multimedia. They present drama to a range of audiences and work in different performance settings.

Students work independently and collaboratively, learning time management skills, showing initiative and demonstrating leadership and interpersonal skills. The Drama General course requires them to develop and practise problem-solving skills through creative and analytical thinking processes. They develop their capacity to respond to, reflect on, and make informed judgements, using appropriate terminology and language to describe, analyse, interpret and evaluate drama, drawing on their understanding of relevant aspects of other art forms.

In this course, students engage in both Australian and world drama practice. They understand how drama has changed over time and will continue to change according to its cultural context. Through the Drama General course, they can understand the experience of other times, places and cultures in an accessible, meaningful and enjoyable way. They understand the economic factors that affect drama practice and explore the vocational opportunities that drama offers.

Structure of the syllabus:

The Year 11 syllabus is divided into two units, each of one semester duration, which are typically delivered as a pair. The notional time for each unit is 55 class contact hours.

Unit 1 – Dramatic storytelling

This unit engages students with the skills, techniques and conventions of dramatic storytelling.

Unit 2 – Drama performance events

This unit focuses on drama performance events for an audience other than their class members.

Each unit includes:

  • a unit description – a short description of the focus of the unit
  • unit content – the content to be taught and learned. This includes acting and non-acting roles and a suggested text list for each unit.

Organisation of content:

The course content is divided into three content areas:

  • drama language
  • contextual knowledge
  • production and performance

Year 12

ATAR

The Drama ATAR course focuses on aesthetic understanding and drama in practice as students integrate their knowledge and skills. They use the elements and conventions of drama to develop and present ideas and explore personal and cultural issues. They engage in drama processes such as improvisation, playbuilding, text interpretation, playwriting and dramaturgy which allow them to create original drama and interpret a range of texts written or devised by others. Their work in this course includes production and design aspects involving sets, costumes, makeup, props, promotional materials, and sound and lighting. Increasingly, students use technologies such as digital sound and multimedia. They present drama to a range of audiences and work in different performance settings.

Students work independently and collaboratively, learning self-management skills, showing initiative and demonstrating leadership and interpersonal skills. The Drama ATAR course requires them to develop and practise problem-solving skills through creative and analytical thinking processes. They develop their capacity to respond to, reflect on, and make informed judgements using appropriate terminology and language to describe, analyse, interpret and evaluate drama, drawing on their understanding of relevant aspects of other art forms.

In this course, students engage in both Australian and world drama practice. They understand how drama has changed over time and will continue to change according to its cultural context. Through the Drama ATAR course, they can understand the experience of other times, places and cultures in an accessible, meaningful and enjoyable way. They understand the economic factors that affect drama practice and explore the vocational opportunities that drama offers.

Structure of the syllabus:

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units which are delivered as a pair. The notional time for the pair of units is 110 class contact hours.

Unit 3 – Representation of drama for contemporary audiences

This unit focuses on reinterpretation of dramatic text, context, forms and styles for contemporary audiences through applying theoretical and practitioner approaches.

Unit 4 – Contemporary and devised drama

This unit focuses on interpreting, manipulating and synthesising a range of practical and theoretical approaches to contemporary and devised drama.

Each unit includes:

  • a unit description – a short description of the focus of the unit
  • unit content – the content to be taught and learned. This includes acting and non-acting roles and set texts for the purposed of the external examination.

Organisation of content:

The course content is divided into three content areas:

  • drama language
  • contextual knowledge
  • production and performance.

Set text list

One Australian text and one world text from the Set text lists in Appendix 2 are to be used to support learning in Unit 3 and Unit 4 in the Drama ATAR course. These texts provide a context for investigating drama in performance and responding to drama based on the drama knowledge, skills, processes and roles of Unit 3 and Unit 4.

General

The Drama General course focuses on aesthetic understanding and drama in practice as students integrate their knowledge and skills. They use the elements and conventions of drama to develop and present ideas and explore personal and cultural issues. They engage in drama processes such as improvisation, play building, text interpretation, playwriting and dramaturgy which allow them to create original drama and interpret a range of texts written or devised by others. Their work in this course includes production and design aspects involving sets, costumes, makeup, props, promotional materials, stage management, front of house activities, and sound and lighting. Increasingly, students use technologies such as digital sound and multimedia. They present drama to a range of audiences and work in different performance settings.

Students work independently and collaboratively, learning time management skills, showing initiative and demonstrating leadership and interpersonal skills. The Drama General course requires them to develop and practise problem-solving skills through creative and analytical thinking processes. They develop their capacity to respond to, reflect on, and make informed judgements using appropriate terminology and language to describe, analyse, interpret and evaluate drama, drawing on their understanding of relevant aspects of other art forms.

In this course, students engage in both Australian and world drama practice. They understand how drama has changed over time and will continue to change according to its cultural context. Through Drama, they can understand the experience of other times, places and cultures in an accessible, meaningful and enjoyable way. They understand the economic factors that affect drama practice and explore the vocational opportunities that drama offers.

Structure of the syllabus:

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units which are delivered as a pair. The notional time for the pair of units is 110 class contact hours.

Unit 3 – Representational, realist drama

This unit focuses on representational, realistic drama. Students explore techniques of characterisation through different approaches to text interpretation, particularly those based on the work of Stanislavski and others.

Unit 4 – Presentational, non-realist drama

This unit focuses on presentational, non-realist drama. Students explore techniques of role and/or character through different approaches to text interpretation, particularly those based on the work of Brecht and others.

Each unit includes:

  • a unit description – a short description of the focus of the unit
  • unit content – the content to be taught and learned.

Organisation of content:

The course content is divided into three content areas:

  • drama language
  • contextual knowledge
  • production and performance

CUA20215 Certificate II in Creative Industries – Live Production (RTO 2401 – Skills Strategies International)

This is a two-year course offered across either Years 10 and 11 OR Years 11 & 12

The Certificate II in Creative Industries – Live Production course is designed to reflect the role of individual’s who perform a range of mainly routine tasks and who work under direct supervision. It is a flexible entry-level qualification, which can be customised to meet a broad range of industry needs. This is a basic introduction to the industry and can assist in obtaining a traineeship position within an entertainment workplace.

This Certificate II course is most suited to high school students wishing to undertake a qualification through Vocational Education and Training (VET) studies.

The course is delivered using a combination of processes through workshop-based projects, online training and a structured work environment. All skills are delivered via integration within the workplace or through simulated tasks throughout the course. Links and associated partnerships with local businesses in the entertainment industry allow further opportunities for structured work experience programmes. These opportunities can also be undertaken within a student’s traineeship agreement.

Students must complete 10 units, including three core compulsory units and seven elective units. The course is delivered through a flexible learning environment and is suited to each individuals learning needs. On average the course for high school students takes 24 months to complete. These include approximately 250 hours of combined study and live practical experience.