Senior School Media Arts

Upcoming Events

Parent/Teacher/Student Interviews

Ashdale Secondary College encourages maximum participation at Parent/Teacher/Student intervie...
View Event Details

College Tour

All prospective parents/guardians are invited to attend a tour of the College on Monday 6 August ...
View Event Details
View All College Events

News

Ashdale Download Newsletter Term 2.2 2018

Please click on the link to view the latest Ashdale Download Newsletter - Term 2.2 2018 and all t...
View Details

Parent/Teacher/Student Interviews Term 3 2018

Ashdale Secondary College encourages maximum participation at Parent/Teacher/Student interviews s...
View Details
View all college news

YEAR 11

ATAR Media Production and Analysis

The Media Production and Analysis ATAR course aims to prepare students for a future in a digital and interconnected world by providing the skills, knowledge and understandings to tell their own stories and interpret the stories of others. Students are encouraged to explore, experiment and interpret their world, reflecting and analysing contemporary life, while understanding that this is done under social, cultural and institutional constraints.  Students, as users and creators of media products, consider the important role of audiences and their context. This course focuses on the application of media theory in the practical process.

Digital technologies have impacted upon and extended the capacity that the media play in Australian lives. Through new technologies, the role of the audience has shifted from a passive consumer to a more active participant, shaping the media through interaction and more accessible modes of production and dissemination of media work. Students’ interaction and opportunity to use technologies enables them to engage with current media and adapt to evolving media platforms.

The production of media work enables students to demonstrate their understanding of the key concepts of media languages, representation, audience, production, skills and processes as well as express their creativity and originality. When producing media work, students learn to make decisions about all aspects of production, including creative choices across pre-production, production and post-production phases. This provides an opportunity for students to reflect on and discuss their own creative work, intentions and outcomes. Within this process, skills are developed enabling students to manipulate technologies which simulate industry experiences.

Structure of the syllabus:

The Year 11 syllabus is divided into two units, each of one semester duration, which are typically delivered as a pair. The notional time for each unit is 55 class contact hours.

Unit 1 – Popular culture

Students analyse, view, listen to and interact with a range of popular media, develop their own ideas, learn production skills and apply their understandings and skills in creating their own productions.

Unit 2 – Journalism

In this unit students will further their understanding of journalistic media. Students will analyse, view, listen to and interact with a range of journalistic genres and they undertake more extensive research into the representation and reporting of groups and issues within media work.

Each unit includes:

  • a unit description – a short description of the focus of the unit
  • suggested contexts – a context in which the unit content could be taught
  • unit content – the content to be taught and learned.

Organisation of content:

The course content is divided into five content areas:

  • Media languages
  • Representation
  • Audience
  • Production
  • Skills and processes.

General Media Production and Analysis

The Media Production and Analysis General course aims to prepare students for a future in a digital and interconnected world by providing the skills, knowledge and understandings to tell their own stories and interpret the stories of others. Students are encouraged to explore, experiment and interpret their world, reflecting and analysing contemporary life, while understanding that this is done under social, cultural and institutional constraints. Students, as users and creators of media products, consider the important role of audiences and their context. This course focuses on the development of technical skills in the practical process.

Digital technologies have had an impact on and extended, the capacity that the media play in all Australian lives. Through new technologies, the role of the audience has shifted from a passive consumer to a more active participant, shaping the media through interaction and more accessible modes of production and dissemination of media work. Students’ interaction and opportunity to use technologies enables them to engage with current media and adapt to evolving media platforms.

The production of media work enables students to demonstrate their understanding of the key concepts of media languages, representation, audience, production, skills and processes as well as express their creativity and originality. When producing media work, students learn to make decisions about all aspects of production, including creative choices across pre-production, production and post-production phases. This provides an opportunity for students to reflect on and discuss their own creative work, intentions and outcomes. Within this process, skills are developed enabling students to manipulate technologies which simulate industry experiences.

Structure of the syllabus:

The Year 11 syllabus is divided into two units, each of one semester duration, which are typically delivered as a pair. The notional time for the pair of units is 110 class contact hours.

Unit 1 – Mass media

Within this broad focus, students reflect on their own use of the media, common representations, including the examination of characters, stars and stereotypes and the way media is constructed and produced.

Unit 2 – Point of view

In this unit, students will be introduced to the concept and learn how a point of view can be constructed. They will analyse media work and construct a point of view in their own productions.

Each unit includes:

  • a unit description – a short description of the focus of the unit
  • suggested contexts – a context in which the unit content could be taught
  • unit content – the content to be taught and learned.

Organisation of content:

The course content is divided into five content areas:

  • Media languages
  • Representation
  • Audience
  • Production
  • Skills and processes.

YEAR 12

ATAR Media Production and Analysis

The Media Production and Analysis ATAR course aims to prepare all students for a future in a digital and interconnected world by providing the skills, knowledge and understandings to tell their own stories and interpret others’ stories. Students learn the languages of media communication and how a story is constructed using representations. Students are encouraged to explore, experiment and interpret their world, reflecting and analysing contemporary life while understanding that this is done under social, cultural and institutional constraints. Students as users and creators of media products, consider the important role of audiences and their context.

Digital technologies have impacted upon and extended the capacity that the media play in Australian lives. Through new technologies, the role of the audience has shifted from a passive consumer to a more active participant, shaping the media through interaction and more accessible modes of production and dissemination of media work. Students’ interaction and opportunity to use technologies enables them to engage with current media and adapt to evolving media platforms.

The production of media work enables students to demonstrate their understanding of the key concepts of media languages, representation, audience, production, skills and processes as well as express their creativity and originality. When producing media work, students learn to make decisions about all aspects of production, including creative choices across pre-production, production and post-production phases. This provides an opportunity for students to reflect on and discuss their own creative work, intentions and outcomes. Within this process, skills are developed enabling students to manipulate technologies which simulate industry experiences.

Structure of the syllabus:

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units which are delivered as a pair. The notional time for the pair of units is 110 class contact hours.

Unit 3 – Media art

In this unit students will analyse, view, listen to and interact with contemporary and traditional examples of media art, identifying techniques and themes, meanings that are created and audiences’ interpretations. They consider the representation of values and technological developments that influence perceptions of art within media work.

Unit 4 – Power and persuasion

The focus for this unit is power and persuasion. Through this broad focus, students extend their understanding of persuasive media, examining the way the media is able to reflect, challenge and shape values and attitudes. They critically analyse, view, listen to, and interact with a range of media work, considering the purposes and values of producers and audiences.

Each unit includes:

  • a unit description – a short description of the focus of the unit
  • unit content – the content to be taught and learned.

Organisation of content:

The course content is divided into five content areas:

  • Media languages
  • Representation
  • Audience
  • Production
  • Skills and processes

General Media Production and Analysis

The Media Production and Analysis General course aims to prepare all students for a future in a digital and interconnected world by providing the skills, knowledge and understandings to tell their own stories and interpret others’ stories. Students learn the languages of media communication and how a story is constructed using representations. Students are encouraged to explore, experiment and interpret their world, reflecting and analysing contemporary life while understanding that this is done under social, cultural and institutional constraints. Students as users and creators of media products, consider the important role of audiences and their context.

Digital technologies have had an impact on and extended the capacity that the media play in all Australian lives. Through new technologies, the role of the audience has shifted from a passive consumer to a more active participant, shaping the media through interaction and more accessible modes of production and dissemination of media work. Students’ interaction and opportunity to use technologies enables them to engage with current media and adapt to evolving media platforms.

The production of media work enables students to demonstrate their understanding of the key concepts of media languages, representation, audience, production, skills and processes as well as express their creativity and originality. When producing media work, students learn to make decisions about all aspects of production, including creative choices across pre-production, production and post-production phases. This provides an opportunity for students to reflect on and discuss their own creative work, intentions and outcomes. Within this process, skills are developed enabling students to manipulate technologies which simulate industry experiences.

Structure of the syllabus:

The Year 12 syllabus is divided into two units which are delivered as a pair. The notional time for the pair of units is 110 class contact hours.

Unit 3 – Entertainment

Within this broad focus, students will expand their understanding of media languages, learning how codes and conventions are used to construct entertainment media.

Unit 4 – Representation and reality

Students will consider different types of representations and how they relate to the construction of reality within media work.

Each unit includes:

  • a unit description – a short description of the focus of the unit
  • suggested contexts – a context in which the unit content could be taught
  • unit content – the content to be taught and learned.

Organisation of content:

The course content is divided into five content areas:

  • Media languages
  • Representation
  • Audience
  • Production
  • Skills and processes.